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Hemorrhagic Stroke

Overview

A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding:

Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood clot (ischemic strokes).

How is a hemorrhagic stroke treated?

Treatment includes efforts to control bleeding, reduce pressure in the brain, and stabilize vital signs, especially blood pressure.

  • To stop the bleeding, you may be given medicine or a transfusion of parts of blood, such as plasma. These are given through an IV.
  • You will be closely monitored for signs of increased pressure on the brain. These signs include restlessness, confusion, trouble following commands, and headache.
  • If the bleeding is due to a ruptured brain aneurysm, surgery or a procedure to repair the aneurysm may be done.
  • In some cases, medicines may be given to control blood pressure, brain swelling, blood sugar levels, fever, and seizures.
  • If a large amount of bleeding has occurred and symptoms are quickly getting worse, you may need surgery to remove the blood that has built up inside the brain and to lower pressure inside the head.

Ask your doctor if a stroke rehab program is right for you. Starting a rehab program can help you recover. And it may help you regain abilities that you may have lost.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: March 28, 2022

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Richard D. Zorowitz MD - Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation